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  • Eating Disorders In Middle Aged Women

     

    Source: dailymail.co.uk

     

    Until recently, eating disorders were considered a condition largely restricted to adolescents and young adults. But research carried out at the University College London has found that three percent of women in their forties and fifties have newly diagnosed eating disorders. 5300 women in this age group participated in the study. In older women, eating disorders are often brought about by divorce, financial strain, empty nest, unemployment, menopause or bereavement.…

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  • The Psychology Behind Anorexia Nervosa

    Source: webmd.com

    Anorexia nervosa is a multi-factorial mental disorder that affects mostly women. This means that it is caused by many interrelated factors and in many instances, there is no single factor to link to disorder. Whatever is the cause, the concern of the individual is to attain an “acceptable” body figure by aggressive means up to the point of starving and killing themselves from the complications of the condition. However, to the person suffering from anorexia nervosa, there is no “acceptable” body weight. There is only disapproval and feeling of disgust every time she sees her image in the mirror.…

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  • Free and Accessible Resources to Help Beat Eating Disorders

    Informational Literature                                                  

    Source:b-eat.co.uk

    The best and most important way to begin recovery is to educate yourself. There are tons of helpful books and articles about eating disorders that can really help you to understand what to expect. If you have a local library, be sure to take a trip and check out some books about eating disorders. There are many books about what to expect, stories of recovery, changing the way you look at yourself, and more. Here are some of the most helpful and popular books that you can read:

    • “Answers to Binge Eating – New Hope for Appetite Control” by Dr. James M. Greenblatt
    • “Body Outlaws: Rewriting the Rules of Beauty and Body Image” by Ophira Edut
    • “Goodbye ED, Hello Me” by Jenni Schaefer
    • “Life Without ED” by Jenni Schaefer
    • “The Eating Disorders Sourcebook: A Comprehensive Guide to the Causes, Treatments, and Prevention of Eating Disorders” by Carolyn Costin
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  • Getting Help – How to Overcome an Eating Disorder

    Assessing the Situation

    Source: bluehorizoned.com

    If you suspect that you may have an eating disorder, the first course of action should be to analyze your family’s past, your current mental state, and attitude towards food. It’s extremely rare for an eating disorder to develop without some kind of risk factor. Eating disorders often run in families, so it’s important to remember that if a family member has an eating disorder, you may be at risk of one. In that same vein, you may have some kind of mental illness that the eating disorder has sprouted from. Mental disorders also often run in families. If you’ve already been diagnosed with some kind of anxiety disorder, depression, or mood disorder and you feel as though you’re developing an unhealthy relationship with food and eating, it may be time to visit your doctor.…

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  • The Relationship Between Depression And Eating Disorders

    Souce: afom.org.au

     

    What is Depression?

     

    Depression is most simply defined as feeling sad with little to no change in mood for at least weeks at a time. Common symptoms include the following:

    • extreme sadness
    • losing interest in things that one enjoyed in the past
    • feeling tired
    • change in eating and sleeping patterns
    • feeling worthless

     

    Connections to Eating Disorders

     

    Source: bluehorizoned.com

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  • Symptoms Of Typical Eating Disorders

    Source: anorexiasupport.net

     

    Anorexia: Common Symptoms and Warning Signs

    Anorexia, also called anorexia nervosa, most typically involves an obsession with one’s weight and calorie intake. In an effort to combat weight gain, patients with anorexia resort to starving themselves or at least eat the bare minimum to survive. Of course, this dramatic restriction of eating causes all kinds of symptoms, the most common being the following:

    • severe weight loss
    • extremely thin appearance
    • tiredness
    • dizziness
    • brittle hair and nails
    • constipation
    • very susceptible to the cold
    • irregular heart beat
    • trouble getting warm
    • dehydration
    • fainting
    • dry skin
    • brittle bones

    These symptoms are developed when anorexia has been present for a substantial amount of time. This means that there are some warning signs present. Typical warning signs of anorexia nervosa include:

    • refusal to eat
    • obsession with weight
    • obsession with appearance
    • skips meals
    • weighing food
    • obsessing over calories and fat content
    • eats a handful of foods that are extremely low calorie
    • cutting food into tiny pieces
    • spitting food out before swallowing it
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  • How to Acknowledge an Eating Disorder

    Diagnosis: Physical Exam

    Source:wikihow.com

    The most common physiological symptoms of eating disorders include, but aren’t necessarily limited to, high/low blood pressure, slow breathing and pulse rates, dry skin or hair, and brittle nails. All of these symptoms, tooth decay, heart irregularities, and extreme dehydration (the most tell tale sign of bulimia), are typical indications of bulimia. In a common doctor’s evaluation, a patient is normally given an x-ray and blood tests to ensure that there are no broken bones, blood levels are relatively normal, and the thyroid, liver, and kidneys are all working properly.…

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  • Three Types Of Eating Disorders

    Awareness of eating disorders is not that prevalent compared with the other mental conditions. The common notions for individuals with eating disorders are usually they just don’t have the appetite to eat, they are just too stressed so they overeat, or they just ate something bad so they want to eliminate that.

    There is so much more about eating disorders. These disorders are serious psychological conditions that require attention from professional therapists.…

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  • Anorexia Nervosa – An Eating Disorder That Can Be Fatal

    Source: crystalinks.com

    In my many years of talking with teens and learning about their personal thoughts on their eating disorders, it has always been sad. I have also come across parents who almost lost their girls due to anorexia or bulimia. It may seem exaggerated for other people. They think that teens with these disorders are faking it and just crave for attention. Others say that they are just being brats for not eating.

    Well, it is correct. These teens do need a lot of attention because if they will be left unattended with an eating disorder in tow, it will literally kill them. Eating disorders are real mental illnesses. It is not something made up just for the sake of being a brat. You have to understand that this is serious and it really happens even to the most promising teens.…

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  • How to Help a Loved One with an Eating Disorder

     

    Source: abcnutritionservices.com

    Recognizing the Signs

    If you think that a friend or family member may have an eating disorder, be sure to check for some of the most common warning signs before confronting them. Typical warning signs include the following:

    • skipping meals
    • eating unusually small portions
    • refusing to eat in front of other people
    • insists that they are not hungry or that they’ve already eaten
    • spits out food before swallowing it
    • avoids foods that are high in fat, especially if they used to love a particular food
    • brags about losing weight drastically
    • analyzes food labels intensely before eating anything
    • forcing themselves to vomit after meals
    • eats huge quantities of food but still remains thin (could mean that they’re binge eating and inducing vomiting)
    • takes large amounts of laxatives or diet pills
    • wears baggy clothes
    • insists that they are overweight when they are extremely underweight
    • hates all of or certain parts of their body
    • believes that they can never be thin enough
    • exercises an unreasonable amount
    • has an obsession with food, eating, and their weight
    • denies that they have a problem
    • controls where they eat, especially if with a group of people
    • has a lack of impulse control
    • engages in self-injury or dangerous behaviors
    • abuses alcohol, sex, prescription and/or street drugs, laxatives, diet pills, etc.

    If you see a variety of these warning signs in a friend or family member, it may be a good idea to take some sort of action.…

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