Breaking News
 | 

Mental Health & Eating Disorders

  • The Psychology Behind Anorexia Nervosa

    Source: webmd.com

    Anorexia nervosa is a multi-factorial mental disorder that affects mostly women. This means that it is caused by many interrelated factors and in many instances, there is no single factor to link to disorder. Whatever is the cause, the concern of the individual is to attain an “acceptable” body figure by aggressive means up to the point of starving and killing themselves from the complications of the condition. However, to the person suffering from anorexia nervosa, there is no “acceptable” body weight. There is only disapproval and feeling of disgust every time she sees her image in the mirror.

    Please follow and like us:
    Read More
  • The Relationship Between Depression And Eating Disorders

    Souce: afom.org.au

     

    What is Depression?

     

    Depression is most simply defined as feeling sad with little to no change in mood for at least weeks at a time. Common symptoms include the following:

    • extreme sadness
    • losing interest in things that one enjoyed in the past
    • feeling tired
    • change in eating and sleeping patterns
    • feeling worthless

     

    Connections to Eating Disorders

     

    Source: bluehorizoned.com

    Please follow and like us:
    Read More
  • How to Acknowledge an Eating Disorder

    Diagnosis: Physical Exam

    Source:wikihow.com

    The most common physiological symptoms of eating disorders include, but aren’t necessarily limited to, high/low blood pressure, slow breathing and pulse rates, dry skin or hair, and brittle nails. All of these symptoms, tooth decay, heart irregularities, and extreme dehydration (the most tell tale sign of bulimia), are typical indications of bulimia. In a common doctor’s evaluation, a patient is normally given an x-ray and blood tests to ensure that there are no broken bones, blood levels are relatively normal, and the thyroid, liver, and kidneys are all working properly.

    Please follow and like us:
    Read More
  • How to Help a Loved One with an Eating Disorder

     

    Source: abcnutritionservices.com

    Recognizing the Signs

    If you think that a friend or family member may have an eating disorder, be sure to check for some of the most common warning signs before confronting them. Typical warning signs include the following:

    • skipping meals
    • eating unusually small portions
    • refusing to eat in front of other people
    • insists that they are not hungry or that they’ve already eaten
    • spits out food before swallowing it
    • avoids foods that are high in fat, especially if they used to love a particular food
    • brags about losing weight drastically
    • analyzes food labels intensely before eating anything
    • forcing themselves to vomit after meals
    • eats huge quantities of food but still remains thin (could mean that they’re binge eating and inducing vomiting)
    • takes large amounts of laxatives or diet pills
    • wears baggy clothes
    • insists that they are overweight when they are extremely underweight
    • hates all of or certain parts of their body
    • believes that they can never be thin enough
    • exercises an unreasonable amount
    • has an obsession with food, eating, and their weight
    • denies that they have a problem
    • controls where they eat, especially if with a group of people
    • has a lack of impulse control
    • engages in self-injury or dangerous behaviors
    • abuses alcohol, sex, prescription and/or street drugs, laxatives, diet pills, etc.

    If you see a variety of these warning signs in a friend or family member, it may be a good idea to take some sort of action.

    Please follow and like us:
    Read More
  • How Eating Disorders Develop

    Mental Illnesses and Eating Disorders

    Source: independencenurse.co.uk

    Mental illnesses are often the culprit when it comes to the origin of how eating disorders come to be. Depression and anxiety disorders are the most common mental disorders that can aid in the development of unhealthy eating habits. Mental illnesses make it easier to be susceptible to low self-esteem, body image issues, feelings of losing control, and inadequacy.

    When it comes to anxiety disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is usually the culprit for eating disorders that sprout from mental illness. It’s easy for those with OCD to develop unhealthy eating habits, many who are diagnosed have strict rituals that they’ve convinced themselves are crucial to practice.

    Please follow and like us:
    Read More
  • The Connection Between Anxiety And Eating Disorders

    Source: paradigmmalibu.com

     

    Overview

    About 67% of individuals with eating disorders also have some type of anxiety disorder, the most common being mental illnesses. Those suffering from anxiety often have low self-esteem and body image issues, making it easier for them to be susceptible to eating disorders and unhealthy eating practices.

    Eating Disorders as Harmful Coping Mechanisms

    Anxiety disorders often cause individuals to try to and find coping mechanisms that can help them to handle the symptoms and feelings they have. However, a lot of the most common coping mechanisms aren’t healthy. In fact, some can worsen symptoms or create additional disorders altogether. A lot of those with an anxiety and eating disorder usually develop their eating habits in an attempt to cope with their anxiety.

    Unfortunately, harmful coping mechanisms affect the individual much more as time goes on. In this attempt to cope, the guilt and anxiety worsen. For those with bulimia and other purging related disorders, the guilt follows an alleviation of anxiety that had been lifted after purging, binging and purging, and other practices. The guilt and anxiety that follow purging are almost always much worse than before. More purging occurs in an effort to mitigate the feelings of sadness and guilt. It works for a short time, but then the cycle repeats itself.

    Please follow and like us:
    Read More
  • Stressed Out – Eating Disorders And Stress

     

    Stress and Anorexia Nervosa

     

    Source: fitnessbright.com

     

    Stress has been proven to be a huge factor in eating disorders — anorexia being the most common. Not only can an increase in stress cause anorexia nervosa, but patients with anorexia are much more susceptible to stress than individuals who don’t. A lot of individuals with anorexia use it as some kind of coping mechanism, making their coping skills inefficient. In addition, having anorexia causes patients to internalize their feelings, have unrealistic standards for themselves, and have issues in dealing with unexpected emotions or life events. All of these factors make individuals with anorexia nervosa much more vulnerable to stress, only worsening their unhealthy condition.

    Please follow and like us:
    Read More